Gatineau
  • 163 Ethel Street
    163 Ethel Street$449,9000 baths
    RE/MAX CORE REALTY INC.
  • 332 Mackay Street
    332 Mackay Street$629,9003 beds, 1 baths
    RE/MAX HALLMARK REALTY GROUP
  • 248 Feriand Street
    248 Feriand Street$309,9004 beds, 2 baths
    CAPITAL HOMES REALTY INC.
  • 225 Alvin Road Unit#707
    225 Alvin Road Unit#707$268,5002 beds, 2 baths
    SUTTON GROUP-PREMIER REALTY (2008) LTD.
  • 204 Alvin Road
    204 Alvin Road$279,9003 beds, 1 baths
    RE/MAX ABSOLUTE REALTY INC.
  • 30 Charlevoix Street Unit#201
    30 Charlevoix Street Unit#201$279,9002 beds, 2 baths
    RE/MAX HALLMARK REALTY GROUP
  • 1112 Blasdell Avenue
    1112 Blasdell Avenue$280,0003 beds, 1 baths
    ONE PERCENT REALTY LTD.
  • 170 Genest Street
    170 Genest Street$355,0000 baths
    COMFREE COMMONSENSE NETWORK
  • 20 Charlevoix Street Unit#29
    20 Charlevoix Street Unit#29$309,9002 beds, 1 baths
    RE/MAX HALLMARK REALTY GROUP
  • 171 Cumberland Street
    171 Cumberland Street$469,0002 beds, 2 baths
    CAPITAL HOMES REALTY INC.
  • 383 Cumberland Street Unit#204
    383 Cumberland Street Unit#204$257,0001 beds, 1 baths
    RE/MAX HALLMARK REALTY GROUP
  • 1103 Georgeton Private
    1103 Georgeton Private$272,9992 beds, 1 baths
    GRAPE VINE REALTY INC.

Quick Facts

Gatineau, like many Quebec cities, has more affordable housing than similar cities of its size in English Canada. According to the Quebec Federation of Real Estate Boards, the median price for a single-family home in Gatineau in September of 2014 was $225,000, which is an increase of 2 percent from the same period last year. The City of Gatineau is the result of an amalgamation of five municipalities: Aylmer, Buckingham, Gatineau, Hull, and Masson-Angers. Hull is the central and oldest part of the city. Aylmer to the west is known as the "Recreation Capital of the National Capital" for its many parks and golf courses. In the east end, Masson-Angers and Buckingham are both highly residential communities surrounded by farmland.

  • 265,300

    Gatineau Population (2011)
  • 9.6%

    5 Year Population Change
  • 117,800

    Number of Homes in Gatineau
Data source: Statistics Canada

Why Buy a Home in Gatineau?

Gatineau is the fourth largest city in Quebec, ideally situated on the northern banks of the Ottawa River across from the nation's capital. Gatineau is primarily a French-speaking city, but many of its residents speak both English and French. It encompasses a large area of land characterized by winding residential streets, industrial and commercial buildings, and vast expanses of green space. Gatineau Park, a 361 km2 federal park located minutes from the city, is the perfect getaway destination for camping, hiking, and recreation. Several cultural attractions can be found in Gatineau. Right across the river, Ottawa provides access to a wealth of notable museums, galleries, and entertainment venues.

Explore Gatineau's Rich Cultural Heritage

The Ottawa River was widely used by the Algonquins for centuries for fishing and transportation. In the early 17th century, it was discovered by European explorers. The settlement that would go on to become Gatineau wasn't settled until 1800 by Philemon Wright. Wright and his family took advantage of the region's many trees and established a lumber camp. Originally known as Wrightstown, the settlement later came to be called Hull. Lumber continued to be Hull's primary industry as it grew in population through the 19th century; the iconic image of the draveurs floating transport logs down the Ottawa River was later printed on the Canadian one-dollar bill. Ottawa, directly across the river from Hull, was selected as the Canadian capital in 1849. Following that, Hull experienced significant growth. It was renamed and incorporated into the City of Gatineau in 2002.

Getting around in Gatineau

Gatineau is serviced by the Soci̩t̩ de transport de l'Outaouais, which operates bus routes in Hull, Aylmer, Gatineau, Buckingham, and Masson-Angers, and offers limited service to suburban communities such as Chelsea and Cantley. Many of Gatineau's major roads and highways cross over into Ottawa. Autoroute 50 is the major highway, connecting Gatineau's downtown centre with Masson-Angers and Buckingham in the east, and extending all the way to Montreal. Aylmer can be reached via the Chemin d'Aylmer or route 148. Gatineau Park has one of North America's most extensive trail networks. For travel by water, get out your kayak, canoe, motor boat, or raft and explore the winding nooks and crannies of the Ottawa and Gatineau Rivers.

Shopping and Amenities

Les Promenades de l'Outaouais and Les Galeries de Hull are both shopping havens, offering the latest in fashion, home d̩cor, and more. Additional shopping options can be found across the river in Ottawa at the Rideau Centre or the Byward Market. Indoor and outdoor sporting facilities are available for just about every activity under the sun, from swimming, to cross-country skiing, to hockey, to golf. There are three French-language school boards in Gatineau that oversee dozens of elementary and secondary schools. The Western Quebec School Board provides primary and secondary education in English. Two universities have campuses in Gatineau, as well as two CEGEPS.

Entertainment and Attractions in Gatineau

History and culture lovers will love living in Gatineau. Twelve national museums are within easy driving distance, including the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Heritage sites like the Manoir-Papineau National Historic Site and the Mackenzie King Estate provide a glimpse into the region's rich history. If you're looking for something a bit more fast-paced, check out the Casino du Lac-Leamy, home to several bars and restaurants, more than 1,800 slot machines, and more than 65 tables. It also boasts an 1100-seat theatre that has become one of the city's major live music venues. For family fun, bring your kids to Calypso Waterpark, featuring Canada's largest wave pool. Or take a weekend getaway into Gatineau Park and re-connect with nature.

Explore Gatineau's Rich Cultural Heritage

The Ottawa River was widely used by the Algonquins for centuries for fishing and transportation. In the early 17th century, it was discovered by European explorers. The settlement that would go on to become Gatineau wasn't settled until 1800 by Philemon Wright. Wright and his family took advantage of the region's many trees and established a lumber camp. Originally known as Wrightstown, the settlement later came to be called Hull. Lumber continued to be Hull's primary industry as it grew in population through the 19th century; the iconic image of the draveurs floating transport logs down the Ottawa River was later printed on the Canadian one-dollar bill. Ottawa, directly across the river from Hull, was selected as the Canadian capital in 1849. Following that, Hull experienced significant growth. It was renamed and incorporated into the City of Gatineau in 2002.

Getting around in Gatineau

Gatineau is serviced by the Soci̩t̩ de transport de l'Outaouais, which operates bus routes in Hull, Aylmer, Gatineau, Buckingham, and Masson-Angers, and offers limited service to suburban communities such as Chelsea and Cantley. Many of Gatineau's major roads and highways cross over into Ottawa. Autoroute 50 is the major highway, connecting Gatineau's downtown centre with Masson-Angers and Buckingham in the east, and extending all the way to Montreal. Aylmer can be reached via the Chemin d'Aylmer or route 148. Gatineau Park has one of North America's most extensive trail networks. For travel by water, get out your kayak, canoe, motor boat, or raft and explore the winding nooks and crannies of the Ottawa and Gatineau Rivers.

Shopping and Amenities

Les Promenades de l'Outaouais and Les Galeries de Hull are both shopping havens, offering the latest in fashion, home d̩cor, and more. Additional shopping options can be found across the river in Ottawa at the Rideau Centre or the Byward Market. Indoor and outdoor sporting facilities are available for just about every activity under the sun, from swimming, to cross-country skiing, to hockey, to golf. There are three French-language school boards in Gatineau that oversee dozens of elementary and secondary schools. The Western Quebec School Board provides primary and secondary education in English. Two universities have campuses in Gatineau, as well as two CEGEPS.

Entertainment and Attractions in Gatineau

History and culture lovers will love living in Gatineau. Twelve national museums are within easy driving distance, including the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Heritage sites like the Manoir-Papineau National Historic Site and the Mackenzie King Estate provide a glimpse into the region's rich history. If you're looking for something a bit more fast-paced, check out the Casino du Lac-Leamy, home to several bars and restaurants, more than 1,800 slot machines, and more than 65 tables. It also boasts an 1100-seat theatre that has become one of the city's major live music venues. For family fun, bring your kids to Calypso Waterpark, featuring Canada's largest wave pool. Or take a weekend getaway into Gatineau Park and re-connect with nature.