Winnipeg
  • 80 River Heights Bv
    80 River Heights Bv$404,9004 beds, 2 baths
    ONE PERCENT REALTY
  • 116 River Heights Bv
    116 River Heights Bv$439,9004 beds, 2 baths
    ROYAL LEPAGE INTEGRITY

Quick Facts

Real estate seekers are attracted to Winnipeg for its multiculturalism and its steady, diversified economy. According to the Canadian Real Estate Association, the average residential selling price in Winnipeg for September 2014 was $265,900, which is an increase of 2 percent from September 2013. Downtown Winnipeg is the city's fastest growing high-income neighbourhood, as well as its economic core. Most residential areas are to the south and west of the city centre, following the course of the river. Tuxedo, located next to the beautiful Assiniboine Park, is Winnipeg's most affluent neighbourhood, home to a number of luxury properties.

  • 663,600

    Winnipeg Population (2011)
  • 4.8%

    5 Year Population Change
  • 280,500

    Number of Homes in Winnipeg
Data source: Statistics Canada

Why Buy a Home in Winnipeg?

Winnipeg is the capital of Manitoba and its largest city. Its location right near the longitudinal centre of North America makes it a transportation hub, with railway connections to Eastern Canada, Western Canada, and the United States. With an estimated 8 million trees in the city, Winnipeg is known for its abundance of vegetation. It is also a culturally diverse city, with the highest percentage of Filipinos of any municipality in Canada. Winnipeg is Manitoba's cultural centre, home to a number of museums, galleries, performing arts organizations, and festivals. Some of its most popular festivals are the Winnipeg Jazz Festival, the Fringe Theatre Festival, and Folkorama.

Explore Winnipeg's Rich Cultural Heritage

Due to its prime location at the fork of two rivers, the area that is now Winnipeg was populated by First Nations for thousands of years before the arrival of European settlers. Archaeological evidence indicates that the First Nations used the rivers as a transportation network for trading with other tribes. French traders arrived in the area toward the middle of the eighteenth century, and were soon followed by the British Hudson's Bay Company. Many French and British traders married First Nations women, and their mixed-race children, the Metis, grew to become a prominent ethnic group. Winnipeg was incorporated as a city in 1873. Like many Canadian cities, it experienced rapid population growth after the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which paved the way to it becoming Manitoba's economic centre.

Getting around in Winnipeg

The public transit system in Winnipeg operates a fleet of 535 buses that service 86 different routes. Transportation around the city's downtown area is free of charge, and free two-hour parking is offered downtown as well. The Trans-Canada Highway passes right through the centre of town, providing for speedy travel by car. Train routes are available in all four cardinal directions. Winnipeg's geography is extremely flat, which makes biking and walking easy to do. The most scenic trails are those that run along the riverbanks, including those at Assiniboine Park and Kildonan Park.

Shopping and Amenities

Winnipeg has a number of unique shopping neighbourhoods including the Exchange District and Academy Village, where you can find antique dealers, book stores, boutiques, and hobby shops. Some of its major shopping malls are Kildonan Place, Cityplace, and Garden City. Fitness and leisure facilities are abundant, as are community centres. Popular golf courses include Bel Acres and Harbour View. For other sports centres, check out the recently completed MTS Iceplex or the multi-purpose Buhler Recreation Park. Winnipeg has a number of elementary and secondary schools, as well as four universities (including the University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg) and the Red River College.

Entertainment and Attractions in Winnipeg

You'll be surprised at the number of things there are to do in Winnipeg. If you're into the arts, be sure to check out the Winnipeg Art Gallery, or any one of the city's acclaimed opera, theatre, and ballet companies. For a night on the town, the trendiest spots can be found in the Exchange District and The Forks. Winnipeg is also known for its indie music scene, which can be found in several live venues and bars. Winnipeg's beloved professional sports teams include the Jets (NHL) and the Blue Bombers (CFL). You can catch a game at the MTS Centre or the soon-to-be-complete Investors Group Field.

Explore Winnipeg's Rich Cultural Heritage

Due to its prime location at the fork of two rivers, the area that is now Winnipeg was populated by First Nations for thousands of years before the arrival of European settlers. Archaeological evidence indicates that the First Nations used the rivers as a transportation network for trading with other tribes. French traders arrived in the area toward the middle of the eighteenth century, and were soon followed by the British Hudson's Bay Company. Many French and British traders married First Nations women, and their mixed-race children, the Metis, grew to become a prominent ethnic group. Winnipeg was incorporated as a city in 1873. Like many Canadian cities, it experienced rapid population growth after the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which paved the way to it becoming Manitoba's economic centre.

Getting around in Winnipeg

The public transit system in Winnipeg operates a fleet of 535 buses that service 86 different routes. Transportation around the city's downtown area is free of charge, and free two-hour parking is offered downtown as well. The Trans-Canada Highway passes right through the centre of town, providing for speedy travel by car. Train routes are available in all four cardinal directions. Winnipeg's geography is extremely flat, which makes biking and walking easy to do. The most scenic trails are those that run along the riverbanks, including those at Assiniboine Park and Kildonan Park.

Shopping and Amenities

Winnipeg has a number of unique shopping neighbourhoods including the Exchange District and Academy Village, where you can find antique dealers, book stores, boutiques, and hobby shops. Some of its major shopping malls are Kildonan Place, Cityplace, and Garden City. Fitness and leisure facilities are abundant, as are community centres. Popular golf courses include Bel Acres and Harbour View. For other sports centres, check out the recently completed MTS Iceplex or the multi-purpose Buhler Recreation Park. Winnipeg has a number of elementary and secondary schools, as well as four universities (including the University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg) and the Red River College.

Entertainment and Attractions in Winnipeg

You'll be surprised at the number of things there are to do in Winnipeg. If you're into the arts, be sure to check out the Winnipeg Art Gallery, or any one of the city's acclaimed opera, theatre, and ballet companies. For a night on the town, the trendiest spots can be found in the Exchange District and The Forks. Winnipeg is also known for its indie music scene, which can be found in several live venues and bars. Winnipeg's beloved professional sports teams include the Jets (NHL) and the Blue Bombers (CFL). You can catch a game at the MTS Centre or the soon-to-be-complete Investors Group Field.