St. John's
  • 39 Otter Drive
    39 Otter Drive$364,9005 beds, 3 baths
    RE/MAX Realty Specialists Limited
  • 16 Glover Place
    16 Glover Place$299,9003 beds, 1 baths
    Century 21 Seller's Choice Inc.
  • 6 Antelope Street
    6 Antelope Street$389,0005 beds, 3 baths
    Hanlon Realty
  • 9 St. Michael's Avenue
    9 St. Michael's Avenue$239,9003 beds, 2 baths
    Century 21 Seller's Choice Inc.
  • 22 Goldeneye Place
    22 Goldeneye Place$429,9004 beds, 3 baths
    Exit Realty on The Rock
  • 42 Freshwater Road
    42 Freshwater Road$229,9004 beds, 1 baths
    Debbie Hanlon Real Estate
  • 144 Donovans Road
    144 Donovans Road$849,9003 beds, 2 baths
    U SELL U SAVE
  • 205 59 Roosevelt Avenue
    205 59 Roosevelt Avenue$385,4002 beds, 1 baths
    Sutton Aurora Realty
  • 11 Lunenburg Street
    11 Lunenburg Street$439,0006 beds, 3 baths
    Exit Realty on The Rock
  • 7 Clover Brae Crescent
    7 Clover Brae Crescent$229,9002 beds, 1 baths
    Century 21 Seller's Choice Inc.
  • 22 Chrisara Place
    22 Chrisara Place$459,9003 beds, 2 baths
    Coldwell Banker ProCo
  • 315 835 Blackmarsh Road
    315 835 Blackmarsh Road$352,9002 beds, 2 baths
    RE/MAX Realty Specialists Limited

Quick Facts

St. John's is a rapidly growing urban centre. It is the capital and largest city in Newfoundland and Labrador. Overall, the city is Canada's 20th largest metropolitan area. Home seekers are drawn to St. John's for its vibrant economy, variety of attractions and friendly populace. According to St. John's Real Estate Online, the average St. John's home sold for $321,928in September of 2014. The 12-month average St. John's home sales price was $334,331. This is significantly less than the national average price of $406,795. The Canadian Real Estate Association reports that at the end of September 2014, the number of active residential listings was up 21.4 percent from the previous year at 3,823. The city's downtown area serves as its cultural hub. Popular areas include Duckworth Street, Water Street and George Street.

  • 196,966

    St. John's Population (2011)
  • 8.8%

    5 Year Population Change
  • 44,830

    Number of Homes in St. John's
Data source: Statistics Canada

Why Buy a Home in St. John's?

St. John's is a bustling urban area with enough space for sizable homes. Its economy boasts thriving retail, business and service sectors. While the St. John's fishing industry is no longer as prosperous as it once was, the city's proximity to the ocean has afforded businesses easy access to oil and gas. St. John's is Eastern Canada's oil and gas centre and is only one of 19 "World Energy Cities." Major corporations like ExxonMobil Canada are headquartered in St. John's while others like Husky Energy, Statoil and Chevron have established regional operations here. The city's economy has quickly grown of late with over 5 percent GDP growth in recent years. The area's unique architecture is distinct from other Canadian cities as it was one of the first British Colonial capitals. Residents find it easy to get around thanks to the efficient Metrobus Transit service. The city hosts numerous festivals and is home to an array of museums, art houses and professional sports teams.

Explore St. John's's Rich Cultural Heritage

St. John's roots stem back to its role as a fishing outpost. It originally served as a space for European fishermen to access the Atlantic Ocean. The city evolved with the Industrial Revolution and has transitioned into a busy urban center. Yet fishing is still a popular activity that locals cherish. St. John's celebrates its heritage through its numerous annual festivals held throughout the city.

Getting around in St. John's

St. John's is at the eastern end of the Trans-Canada Highway. Residents typically get around town by car, foot or the Metrobus Transit. The Metrobus has 19 routes and over 50 buses that over 3 million people ride each year. In 2009, the city launched its St. John's Cycling Master Plan to paint 43 kilometres of bike lanes, add signs on 73 kilometres of roads, add bike racks to Metrobuses and implement 20 bike parking facilities. The city is served by the St. John's International Airport. This airport is only 10 minutes from the city's central business district and is the country's second busiest in terms of Atlantic Canada passenger volume.

Shopping and Amenities

The best places to shop are downtown. Check out the seemingly endless clothing boutiques, shops and restaurants on Duckworth Street and Water Street. The city is also home to several sports teams including the Winnipeg Jets' minor league affiliate, the St. John's IceCaps. St. John's rugby union team, The Rock, is quite popular as are the St. John's Avalon Harps. The Harps compete in Canada's GAA Gaelic Football and Hurling events. Locals love curling. St. John's has hosted numerous curling tournaments including some championships. City residents enjoy the abundance of urban parks. Of particular note is Pippy Park. Pippy is one of the country's largest urban parks. It has all sorts of recreational facilities including two golf courses. Other popular parks include scenic Bowring Park in the Waterford Valley and the Victorian styled Bannerman Park.

Entertainment and Attractions in St. John's

St. John's is famous for its extravagant festivals. These include the George Street Festival, the Tuckamore Festival, the Nickel Film Festival and the Mardi Gras Festival. St. John's also boasts several museums and art houses. These include the LSPU Hall's Resource Centre for the Arts, the St. John's Arts and Culture Centre and The Rooms. Found at Signal Hill, the Johnson Geo Centre serves as a geological interpretation centre that educates the public about the area's dramatic geological history. There's also the Railway Coastal museum found on Water Street's century old Newfoundland and Labrador train station. Downtown St. John's boasts the East Rider Motorcycle Museum that displays 110 years of the area's motorcycle history. In total, St. John's has 21 National Historic Sites of Canada.

Explore St. John's's Rich Cultural Heritage

St. John's roots stem back to its role as a fishing outpost. It originally served as a space for European fishermen to access the Atlantic Ocean. The city evolved with the Industrial Revolution and has transitioned into a busy urban center. Yet fishing is still a popular activity that locals cherish. St. John's celebrates its heritage through its numerous annual festivals held throughout the city.

Getting around in St. John's

St. John's is at the eastern end of the Trans-Canada Highway. Residents typically get around town by car, foot or the Metrobus Transit. The Metrobus has 19 routes and over 50 buses that over 3 million people ride each year. In 2009, the city launched its St. John's Cycling Master Plan to paint 43 kilometres of bike lanes, add signs on 73 kilometres of roads, add bike racks to Metrobuses and implement 20 bike parking facilities. The city is served by the St. John's International Airport. This airport is only 10 minutes from the city's central business district and is the country's second busiest in terms of Atlantic Canada passenger volume.

Shopping and Amenities

The best places to shop are downtown. Check out the seemingly endless clothing boutiques, shops and restaurants on Duckworth Street and Water Street. The city is also home to several sports teams including the Winnipeg Jets' minor league affiliate, the St. John's IceCaps. St. John's rugby union team, The Rock, is quite popular as are the St. John's Avalon Harps. The Harps compete in Canada's GAA Gaelic Football and Hurling events. Locals love curling. St. John's has hosted numerous curling tournaments including some championships. City residents enjoy the abundance of urban parks. Of particular note is Pippy Park. Pippy is one of the country's largest urban parks. It has all sorts of recreational facilities including two golf courses. Other popular parks include scenic Bowring Park in the Waterford Valley and the Victorian styled Bannerman Park.

Entertainment and Attractions in St. John's

St. John's is famous for its extravagant festivals. These include the George Street Festival, the Tuckamore Festival, the Nickel Film Festival and the Mardi Gras Festival. St. John's also boasts several museums and art houses. These include the LSPU Hall's Resource Centre for the Arts, the St. John's Arts and Culture Centre and The Rooms. Found at Signal Hill, the Johnson Geo Centre serves as a geological interpretation centre that educates the public about the area's dramatic geological history. There's also the Railway Coastal museum found on Water Street's century old Newfoundland and Labrador train station. Downtown St. John's boasts the East Rider Motorcycle Museum that displays 110 years of the area's motorcycle history. In total, St. John's has 21 National Historic Sites of Canada.